Jenson Button has admitted to mixed feelings about the drag reduction system used in F1 this season.

The introduction of DRS has played a major part in increasing overtaking this season alongside the new Pirelli tyres although there have been occasions when DRS has been criticised by fans for making it too easy for drivers to make a move for position.

Speaking in the Thursday press conference in Hungary ahead of the latest round of the season this weekend, Button admitted that DRS has played a major role in the increase in overtaking this season although he conceded that it had led to some 'boring' moves.

"I think the tyres have played a big part, and KERS," he said. "I don't think we can forget about KERS. I think it's played a big part in overtaking. Obviously we all have it, but it's how you use it on the circuit. I think DRS has obviously made a couple of boring moves, but I think it's helped tremendously.

"I think the good outweighs the bad, with DRS. The last race - it was very, very difficult to overtake with DRS, for me it was impossible but it put you in an easier position to challenge later on in the lap. I think the changes that have been made have been great and I think we've just got to watch the races back and see the fights and the overtaking moves. It's that we're taking more risks this year, it's a different situation than we've found before.

"There's a lot of great overtaking and I think Formula One is in a great place. I keep saying it but it's the truth."

Button added that he expected DRS - alongside the new tyres and KERS - to have a positive impact on the Hungarian race this weekend at a circuit where overtaking has always been difficult.

"You can overtake here," he said. "There are a couple of places and I think with the tyres, with KERS, with DRS, we have seen a lot of improvements in overtaking. I don't think this will be any different. First of all the aim is to qualify as high as possible and and not have to overtake anyone but it is always there if it's needed."

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