Moto2 World Championship title contender Marco Bezzecchi has been awarded the inaugural Triumph Triple Trophy, an accolade that earns him a brand-new specially liveried Triumph Street Triple RS 765 for the road - despite the fact he doesn’t have a licence to ride it as yet.

The Italian is one of four riders in contention for the Moto2 title in Portimao this season, together with Enea Bastianini, Sam Lowes and Luca Marini, though he is considered a long shot at 23 points shy of the top spot.

Nonetheless, Bezzecchi’s efforts have not gone unnoticed elsewhere with the Sky Italia VR46 rider landing the inaugural Triumph Triple Trophy, which recognises success beyond a race win by developing a points’ system based around fastest top speed (7 points), pole position (6) and fastest race lap (5).

 

 

For his troubles Bezzecchi was rewarded with a Triumph Street Triple RS 765, which utilises the same base engine as his Moto2 machine.

Speaking to journalists ahead of the weekend, Bezzecchi says the gift was a welcome surprise when it was presented to him in the pit-lane at Portimao but joked he wouldn’t be able to ride it just yet because he doesn’t have a roadgoing licence.

“I have never had a road bike so I have never had the licence, so it would be the first thing that I will do. I like the bike, the colours, the tyres, Ohlins shock and the suspension are good, I didn’t expect it.

“It’s nice to have the same engine as my racing bike. For sure the racing bike has something more but this is already a very powerful bike so to ride it on the road will be impressive and the torque of this engine is amazing, it’s the first thing that you feel as soon as you try it for the first time.”

Reflecting on what has been a vastly improved season for Bezzecchi during his sophomore campaign with two wins to his name, the 22-year old says he has learned a lot in two seasons at intermediate level.

“When you change categories it is always difficult, I had maybe too high expectations from myself so this didn’t help myself because when you don’t get the result it is a bit more hard. 

“I didn’t give up, I tried to work on my riding styles and to adapt to the bike, so as soon as I changed team I found myself better with the team and the bike and the work of last year helped me a lot as a rider.”

 

Comments

Loading Comments...