BT Sport will broadcast the Argentina MotoGP live in the UK. Their coverage begins at 3pm on Sunday April 3.

The warm-ups for MotoGP, Moto2 and Moto3 are live on BT Sport from 1.30pm on Sunday.

MotoGP qualifying is live on BT Sport from 6.15pm on Saturday April 2.

Free Practice 3 is live on BT Sport from 12.45pm on Saturday.

Argentina MotoGP race weekend schedule

Saturday April 2

12:45-13:25 UK - Moto3 FP1

13:40-13:25 UK - Moto2 FP1

14:35-15:20 UK - MotoGP FP1

15:35-16:15 UK - Moto3 FP2

16:30-17:10 UK - Moto2 FP2

17:25-18:10 UK - MotoGP FP2

18:35-18:50 UK - Moto3 Qualifying 1

19:00-19:15 UK - Moto3 Qualifying 2

19:30-19:45 UK - Moto2 Qualifying 1

19:55-20:10 UK - Moto2 Qualifying 2

20:25-20:55 UK - MotoGP FP3

21:05-21:20 UK - MotoGP Qualifying 1

21:30-21:45 UK - MotoGP Qualifying 2

Sunday April 3

13.30-13.50 UK - Moto 3 warm-up

14.00-14.20 UK - Moto2 warm-up

14.30-15.00 UK - MotoGP warm-up

16.00 UK - Moto3 race

17.20 UK - Moto2 race

19.00 UK - MotoGP race

Would a two-day MotoGP weekend be better?

Fabio Quartararo said: “At the end, it’s always the same; if your bike is working straight away then you can even have just one day. At the moment, as soon as you have a little bit of difficulty then you have Friday evening and the morning to think about it.

“It’s difficult to say, but it will be a great experience to have two days because if we have many more GP’s then it will be much more difficult (to have full weekends). 

“From my point of view, I like to be moving around but it’s more for the mechanics and the families. But it will be a great experience to have just two days.”

Johann Zarco disagreed: “If you have experience then you can enjoy just two days. As Fabio [Quartararo] says, if you have the bike ready and you have all your references on the track, you can have maybe more advantage to have a great race. 

“But to work and progress as a rider, but also work technically with the bike, it’s always better three days. 

“If in the future it is two days then clearly they save money. It’s one night less in the hotels. But I think it’s not really good for the sport, yes, better for the show, but not for the sport.”

Miguel Oliveira said: “I don’t know! I mean, I’ve never heard that suggestion in the past. 

“I’ve never really thought about it. It will be a unique experience and hopefully we can get more ideas on whether that makes sense. But technically, for us to have three days is much better than two.” 

Front ride-height ban 'unfair', 'cannot pick and choose'

The news that front ride-height devices will be banned in the MotoGP World Championship from 2023 hasn't gone down well with Ducati's riders.

While all MotoGP manufacturers now have a rear ride-height device, as well as a 'single use' front and rear holeshot system for the start of a race, Ducati is currently the only manufacturer with a repeatable front-lowering ride-height device for corner exit.

Lowering the bike helps to resist wheelies under hard acceleration, but while the front system has been under development by Ducati's MotoGP riders since winter testing it is yet to be fully refined and currently not always used.

Nevertheless, members of the Grand Prix Commission were asked to consider 'two alternative proposals' for the future of ride-height devices with the 'objective of preventing further performance improvements and development cost increases'.

It is not clear what the other proposal was but a ban on the front system for 2023 was voted through by unanimous agreement of the four parties; MSMA, IRTA, Dorna and FIM.