Two of the women involved in Max Mosley's widely-reported orgy have confirmed the FIA president's claims that the session did not have a Nazi theme.

Mosley, who faced calls to quit over the accusations, made no secret of his involvement in the sado-masochistic sex session - and has since told the court hearing his case against the News of the World that he has partaken of such practices for most of his adult life - but always insisted that the Nazi connotations were a slur based upon his family history. Mosley's father, Oswald, was leader of the British Fascist Party in the 1930s.

Woman D, one of four women involved in the orgy who cannot be named for legal reasons, revealed that it had had 'prison' theme but admitted that she had been disgusted, both at being linked to potential Nazi roleplay and being described as 'a hooker'.

"I am particularly appalled at the accusations that our scenarios had any Nazi connotation or overtones," she said, telling the court that she had been 'among friends' during the session, "No Nazi images, uniforms or material were used. I did not see anything Nazi."

A second witness, Woman A, confirmed that there had been a detention theme to the session, but concurred that there had been no Nazi element.

"I would not contemplate putting on such scenes, which I would find distasteful," she said, "I would expect most people to be disgusted at the suggestion of a Nazi theme and respond similarly."

The same witness admitted that there had been a German flavour to the session after they had heard a third witness - Woman B - speaking to 68-year old Mosley in German at a party at the beginning of the year.

"We said 'that's really sexy and horny and wouldn't it be great if we did a scenario like that' - and then it went from there."

Witness A also told the court that she had felt betrayed by the revelations, which were leaked to the media by a close friend - identified by the court as Woman E - after she had introduced her to Mosley for the session. She revealed that they had shared a house, which both used for 'work'.

Woman B - who addressed the court in a German accent - admitted that her 'outfit' had included a Luftwaffe jacket, but insisted that it had not been used to portray any particular role. She claimed that she had bought it from a fashion market to wear to a concert, and would 'under no circumstances' have taken part in Nazi-themed activities.

"I'm very upset and offended because it is an insult and offence if a newspaper equates German with being Nazi - my grandparents were not members of that party," she insisted, undrlining that Mosley had not suggested such a theme.

Giving further testimony to the court, Mosley had earlier repeated his claim that there had been no Nazi theme to the orgy, despite the prosecution introducing an audio tape of a different session in which 'the Aryan race' was referred to.

"Had I wanted a Nazi scene, I would have said I wanted one and 'A' would have got some of the inexpensive Nazi stuff from a joke shop that provides uniforms and would not have gone to Marks and Spencer and got quite expensive jackets," he claimed, before defending the use of a German backdrop to the session.

"German somehow sounds appropriate for a bossy, dominant character. It is a harsh-sounding - rather than a romantic - language."

The case continues.