F1 is set to reveal a provisional 2022 calendar featuring a record-breaking 23 races - the most in the history of the world championship - at next week’s FIA World Motor Sport Council. 

It has led to concerns about the wellbeing of workers involved in the sport and team crew, with four-time world champion Sebastian Vettel among the drivers urging F1 not to “neglect” the human cost of an even more congested schedule. 

The 2022 calendar is expected to contain at least two triple-headers and it is understood there could be as many as 10 races in 13 weekends following the summer break in August. 

But speaking on Friday ahead of this weekend’s Turkish Grand Prix, AlphaTauri boss Tost insisted he had no problem with what F1 has planned for next year. 

“We know we have 23 races, it’s fantastic, good job from F1,” Tost said. “I’m looking forward to it.

“Regarding the people at the track; first of all we are a race team and they all should be happy we have as many races as possible.

“Of course, we take care of the people. For example the mechanics after a race weekend they have three or four days off where they can stay at home.

“Also press, marketing, all the people at the racetrack have three days after the race weekend.

“The engineers is a little more difficult. But if I remember back in former times, they had to go after a race weekend to test, which means they also had to work there.

“We all should be happy to be in a position to be in F1 and to have 23 races. If someone doesn’t like it, he should go.”

A number of teams have highlighted concerns with the prospect of a swelling calendar, with McLaren being one of the most vocal. 

Ferrari sporting director Laurent Mekies explained how the Italian outfit is putting provisions in place to support the mental and physical wellbeing its staff. 

“We are building season after season a programme for the race team in order to stay in the best conditions possible,” he said. 

“And you add item after item so you start from the physical aspects and then you go to the nutrition aspect and then eventually we are also looking at the mental aspects to make sure that people have a good balance and stay in good shape and in good spirits.

“I think all the teams are going to inevitably spend more and more energy on trying to keep their people in good shape for these long calendars.

“But it’s something that is very well embraced by all involved and I’m sure there will be further steps in the right direction.”