Question:
How do you think things have gone so far this year?

Nick Morgan:
I think we're fairly pleased with how things have gone so far this year, although I have to temper that by saying we want better results - we're always going to say that, as we want to win! The Superbike class with Michael has been a new adventure for us and it's been a difficult one and one which the team has adapted to well.

Q:
Has the jump up to Superbikes been difficult?

NM:
That's an understatement! Yes, it has. Remember we weren't even going Superbike racing until just after Christmas: that's when the wheels were put in motion for us to get onto the Bennetts British Superbike grid. I think for the sort of bike we've now got, we've come a long way. That's in part thanks to the hard-work of the team and the experience from people like Michael Rutter and Jack Valentine. People may shrug their shoulders at some of our results, but the reality of it is that we're not a big, mega-bucks team. We're running on a budget of around ?800,000, where our competitors: such as Crescent Rizla Suzuki, HM Plant Honda Racing and Airwaves Ducati are on around double that.

Q:
So is the move up to the Superbike class is effectively a long-term plan?

NM:
I think it has to be. You can't simply come into this class and win, not unless you've got a large and already assembled infrastructure and 'factory' relationship with a major manufacturer. This is our first year and it's a year where we're basically doing our best to improve race-by-race and form relationships - be it with team sponsors, riders, Kawasaki Motors UK and suppliers, so that we can get as good a foundation as possible for 2008 and beyond. That's the aim.

Q:
There are highs and lows in any year, what are yours?

NM:
I think to take a podium at the North West 200 in only our fifth ever Superbike race was a highlight. Netting seventh at the first round of the season on the Superbike at Brands Hatch was also nice. Michael getting hurt at Snetterton was a low point, but then seeing just how well Stuart could go on the ZX-10R was nice to see. Ups and downs are part of racing. You live for the ups and try and forget the downs as quickly as possible! Oh, and the weather's been pretty rubbish, too!

Q:
So did Stuart impress when subbing for Michael?

NM:
Most definitely. The two race weekends he had on both bikes were very busy ones for him, but I think he acquitted himself very well indeed. I think he's still young enough to get on a Superbike and do the business. With Michael I think it's important to say that he hasn't lost any of his edge at all. He's still capable of doing the business and it's up to us as a team to give him the machinery to do just that.

Q:
And how has the Supersport season gone so far?

NM:
It's been a little frustrating as obviously this is the class we know well and we know how to build a good Supersport bike. In Stuart Easton we have a class rider and ex-champ. He knows how to win races and when everything's right, people don't get to see which way he goes. Our issue with the bike has been a slight lack of drive off the corners, which we've been working on a lot recently with increased dyno work.

Also, Stuart has issues with qualifying tyres. It seems that there's almost too much grip, as it changes the way the bike feels for him, making it harder for him to get a good time. That said Stuart and the team have worked had to get the Ninja ZX-6R working very well on race set-up and race Dunlop tyres. We've been pretty unlucky not to get onto the podium so far, so with the last three rounds at tracks Stuart likes and ones that the ZX-6R should suit a little more than the previous tight and twisty tracks, we're confident of getting the rostrums that bike, rider and team deserve.

Q:
What are you looking for from the last few races of the season?

NM:
The team has made a major investment in the adoption of a WSB-spec engine package. It shows our sponsors, Kawasaki Motors UK, the fans and the rest of the paddock that we're taking it seriously and we want to succeed in the toughest domestic Superbike championship in the world. As I've said, we want to use 2007 as a foundation for the future, so hopefully with the new engines and other technical developments coming along for our Ninja ZX-10Rs, a few more improved results would give us the springboard that we need. It would also liven up the championship a bit if we could - given a little luck - get amongst the big boys and be battling for the odd podium.